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Nurse's Corner

 Rethink Your Drink

 

Americans are eating and drinking too much added sugars which can lead to health problems such as weight gain and obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. To live healthier, longer lives, most need to move more and eat better including getting fewer calories from added sugars.

  • Added sugars are sugars and syrups that are added to foods or beverages when they are processed or prepared. Naturally occurring sugars such as those in fruit or milk are not added sugars.
  • Added sugars are called by many different names. Examples of added sugars seen on ingredient labels include brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, dextrose, fructose, glucose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, lactose, malt syrup, maltose, molasses, raw sugar, and sucrose.
  • The leading sources of added sugars in the US diet are sugar-sweetened beverages, grain-based desserts like cakes and cookies, candy, and dairy desserts like ice cream. Reducing the amount of sugary drinks and sugary foods each day and replacing these with plain water and fruit might be a good way to reduce added sugars intake.

Drinking enough water every day is good for overall health. As plain drinking water has zero calories, it can also help with managing body weight and reducing caloric intake when substituted for drinks with calories, like regular soda.  Drinking water can prevent dehydration, a condition that can cause unclear thinking, result in mood change, cause your body to overheat, constipation, and kidney stones.

  • Although daily fluid intake can come from food and beverages, plain drinking water is one good way of getting fluids as it has zero calories.
  • In 2005-2010, U.S. youth drank an average of 15 ounces of water and U.S. adults drank an average of 39 ounces of water on a given day. 
  • Among U.S. youth, plain water intake is lower in younger children, non-Hispanic black, Mexican-American.
  • Among U.S. adults, plain water intake is lower in older adults, lower-income adults, and those with lower education.
  • U.S. adolescents who drink less water tended to drink less milk, eat less fruits and vegetables, drink more sugar-sweetened beverages, eat more fast food, and get less physical activity

Please, see the attached documents for more information or go to the CDC website.

(The above information was gathered from CDC website.)

 
Folder Rethink Your Drink (1 Files)
pdf file rethink_your_drink.pdf
Folder Cardiac Emergency Response Plan (CERP) (2 Files)
doc file Cardiac Emergency Response Plan and Protocol 2018-2019.docx
doc file Cardiac Emergency Quick Response Guide 2018-2019.docx
Folder Diabetes Awareness & Prevention (4 Files)
pdf file Diabetes.pdf
pdf file diabetes-infographic.pdf
pdf file DiabetesMyths.pdf
pdf file DiabetesWhatIsIt.pdf
Folder Flu Information for Parents (4 Files)
pdf file flu-guide-for-parents-2017.pdf
pdf file why-get-a-flu-vaccine.pdf
pdf file who-should-should-not-vaccinate.pdf
pdf file whats-new-2018-2019-factsheet.pdf
Folder Handwashing (2 Files)
pdf file hand-sanitizer-factsheet.pdf
pdf file handwashing-poster.pdf
Folder Health Forms (3 Files)
pdf file Asthma Plan
pdf file Medication Permission Form
doc file Student Health Form
Folder Heart Health & Awareness (4 Files)
pdf file Feb.PHW.pdf
pdf file Feb.SCA.pdf
pdf file Feb.SCAFactSheet.pdf
pdf file Feb.SCAinYouthStatsFactSheet.pdf
Folder Wellness Policy (1 Files)
doc file District Wellness Policy 2018-2019.docx
Folder Juul Information (2 Files)
pdf file Juul parent info.pdf
pdf file Juul.pdf
Folder School Nurse Newsletter (1 Files)
pdf file Calhoun County School Nurse newsletter.pdf